The Simple Beginnings

Updated: Apr 24

HELLO EVERYONE!

Today’s post is going back to basics, with everything crochet. I know there are many other websites out there you could use, but hey, why not have one here too? I am a teaching website after all…well, as far as education goes, I’m learning, and I’d like you guys to learn with me.

So, we’re going to learn how to make chains, what the abbreviations for that are and what you can do with those chains. It sounds easy enough, and technically it is, you just have to work your way around the explanations and try it for yourself. Anyway, without further ado, let’s start!


How Do You Start?

Let’s say you’re working in rows, which are straight lines, so you don’t have to join up ends or anything! Don’t worry, if you want to know how to do joined ends, and working in rounds, I’ll get to that in a bit! Let’s just get you started with the basics.

As I was saying, let’s say you’re working in rows, you’d need a starting chain, or stitch. Now, there are two words for this, because when you start the project, the first stitch you make is called a “chain”, since it’s not attached to anything (yet), but when you’re on your second row (which will be called your first row – confusing I know), the starting chain then becomes a “stitch”. It’s because it’s no longer just a chain of stitches, but a stitch in a row.


Are You Guys With Me So Far?

Ok, so let’s actually start making this stitch. First off, you need to know how to hold the yarn. If you’ve taken a look at my “tip of the month” you’ll see that weaving the yarn through your fingers is the best way to hold it, it’s comfortable, and it makes sure the yarn attached to the ball is not in the way of your project.


Now, you’re working on the line of yarn between your first finger and your thumb (as demonstrated in the photo below).

Take your hook (or needle, whatever you want to call it), and loop the yarn over it. The best way to do that is to hold the hook over the yarn, point it downwards, and then point it back up (as up goes), bringing the yarn with it. So, it should look like the photo below.

Are you still good? Ok, so now, we just have to pull the yarn through that loop, and the best way to do that is to make sure your loop is big enough to pull through, so hold it between your middle finger and your thumb.

Now, you’re ready to pull it through! So, loop the yarn over your hook again (this time you don’t need to point down, just twirl it around the yarn, like a ballet dancer) and hey presto, pull it through.

SO NOW, YOU HAVE YOUR FIRST STITCH, OR YOUR STARTING CHAIN!

Here comes the easy part now, all you have to do is rinse and repeat (not literally rinse, just repeat…). So, let’s look at that again:

Loop (which means twirl like a ballet dancer)…

Hook the loop…

Pull it through!

Now you have your second chain, and the same thing goes for the rest. Like I said, rinse and repeat! It’s that simple.

I’d suggest, before trying out other crochet stitches, just keep making chains like this. Do as many stitches as you can, or want to, just so you can get a feel for it, and you know how tight, or how loose, you need to make your them. Remember, don’t make them too tight, otherwise you won’t be able to work in them later, and don’t make them too loose either, otherwise you’ll find yourself with a very hole-y (see what I did there…I crack myself up) project.


Ok, so that’s our introduction to crochet! Next time, I’ll tell you how to make the next row, and why it’s always called the “first row” rather than the second.


Abbreviations

Oh, but before I go, there is one more thing I have to say. In many crochet patterns you’ll find, whether on the internet, or in a book, or in your mom’s old catalogue, there are abbreviations that they use, when referring to chains and stitches.


For chains they use the abbreviation Ch.


And for stitches they use St.

Do you see why?


It’s mostly just because it’s easier to refer to chains as “ch”, and stitch as “st”, especially if you’re a fan of crochet, or a professional. So, the next time you take a quick peak at a pattern, now you know what those weird abbreviations stand for!


Well, that’s it from me today! I’ll see you guys next time! And don’t forget to keep practicing those chains! I want to see your progress, so send me those pictures!


With love,


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